Hunterdon County Historical Society: Goodspeed Stories, June 2021

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Hunterdon Co. National Bank Meets Civil War

** June 11, 2021
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I am continually amazed at how so interesting a seemingly boring subject, like the story of a bank and its building, could turn out. You can usually tell how interested I am by how many parts of a story I end up posting. I was sure I could finish this in one, but no, we needed a second part, published today (with more interesting photos). And when I got to the end, I realized I only needed one more episode in this banking story. I will try to shorten it but I cannot guarantee anything.

Flemington’s First Bank, Part Two (https://goodspeedhistories.com/flemingtons-first-bank-part-two/)
This article takes place during the Civil War, a strange time to build a magnificent bank building. It certainly reflects how much more secure the residents of northern New Jersey felt compared to their neighbors to the south.

An unfortunate name
Speaking of banks, as I perused the Hunterdon Republican newspaper of old, I learned that on July 10, 1871, the directors of the Lambertville National Bank elected a new teller, since their former teller, Martin L. Reeve, had recently passed away. But I have to wonder what these directors were thinking when they chose to replace him with a man named William Crook.
It’s hard to believe this was a real person, but in fact the Crook brothers, William and Charles, were born in New Jersey but moved to New Hope in 1850 and raised their family there. William Crook prospered in his new home, calling himself a Gentleman in the 1860 census. But in 1870 he found it necessary to return to the workforce, taking the post of bank teller of Lambertville bank. Fortunately for him, the directors did not hold his name against him.

12th anniversary for GH
My calendar tells me that twelve years ago today I started posting articles on my website. My website tells me that so far, including family trees and today’s article, I have posted 543. This is not a pretty round number, but more than I realize. thought at the outset. The problem is, there is so much to write about!

Indexing of articles
They say it’s important to keep printed copies of your work, but knowing where they are is a real challenge. I have been working on my index lately. This differs from the “Item List” which appears in the top menu bar. This brings you to a chronological list, starting with the most recent article. My Index does something different: it brings together articles by subject, sorted by time and place. Because I’m somewhat brash about what I choose to write, it’s not always easy to understand how past articles fit together. I’m working on it, but I’m far from finished.

Well, they might have “sang” for just a few days in 1889, but they last forever in 2021! And my boy, do they sing loudly! No wonder they rest for 17 years.

June 13, 1894, Brief News from Glen Gardner: “The seventeen year old locusts have arrived and there are millions!


This press release was produced by the Hunterdon County Historical Society. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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